FAQs

Tribunal FAQs

No. If your appeal is refused, you cannot appeal again.

Yes, but only with permission of the Court.

In the first instance, the parties will usually be responsible for the cost of their own lawyers. The Tribunal will not normally order one party to pay another’s legal costs, but is entitled to do so if it considers that justice so requires.

If the judges can’t reach a unanimous decision on your case, then the judgment of the Tribunal will be that of the majority of the judges.

After the Tribunal has heard all of the evidence and any submissions made by the lawyers, it will issue its judgment. Sometimes, the Tribunal may issue its judgment on the same day it hears your case but, usually, the judges will need further time to consider the case and will deliver their judgment at a later date.

The Tribunal may make a costs award against you and may even dismiss your Appeal or strike out your Response.

That depends on how complex the case is and how much evidence there is to be considered. Tribunal hearings usually take place between 10am and 4pm, although how many days a hearing will last varies considerably.

You will be required to take an Oath (on a holy book) or Affirmation (a promise to tell the truth) before giving evidence in the Tribunal.

If you plan to give evidence in the Tribunal, then it is highly likely that you will be asked questions by your own lawyer (if you have one), your opponent’s lawyer (if they have one) and sometimes the judges.

Yes. Tribunal hearings will be in public unless the Tribunal orders otherwise.

The Tribunal will sometimes permit those people who are unable to attend the Tribunal in person, to provide their evidence via audio or video link.

The Tribunal hearings take place in a specialist courtroom located on the 12th floor of Qatar Financial Centre Tower 2. A location map can be found on this website.

Yes. Witnesses who give relevant and admissible evidence in support of your case may be called to give evidence. The Registrar or the Tribunal will usually give directions in relation to witness evidence.

Yes. The Tribunal has the power to order disclosure as it considers appropriate.

Yes. You will have 28 days in which to reply to the Response.

If you are served with an Appeal Notice, you will have 28 days in which to respond.

Proceedings are commenced by the filing of a written Appeal Notice.

No. Forms are not required for commencing or responding to appeals before the Tribunal. The information required by the Tribunal is contained within its Regulations and Procedural Rules.

Yes. They are available on this website and should be read before commencing an appeal in the Tribunal.

Yes. Although many parties to legal proceedings will decide to instruct a lawyer to represent them, you may represent yourself before the Tribunal should you wish.

If any party to Tribunal proceedings requires an interpreter when giving evidence, the Registrar will arrange for one to be made available.

Proceedings in the Tribunal will usually be in English, although can be conducted in Arabic should the parties so wish.

There are no fees associated with bringing a case to the Tribunal. However, if you instruct lawyers you will usually be liable for their fees, unless the Tribunal orders otherwise.

The Registrar is Head of the Tribunal’s Registry and is responsible for the management of the cases before the Tribunal. The Registrar’s biography can be found on this website.

The Registrar, in consultation with the Chairman of the Tribunal, will determine which judges hear which cases.

Judges of the Tribunal sit in panels of three.

The judges of the Tribunal are some of the most well-known legal and judicial figures from around the world. Biographies of all the judges of the Tribunal can be found on this website.

The Tribunal is a specialist body which hears appeals against decisions of the various institutions that make up the Qatar Financial Centre. The Court, on the other hand, hears civil and commercial disputes in accordance with the relevant provisions of the QFC Law.

The Tribunal has the jurisdiction (the legal authority) to hear appeals raised by individuals and corporate bodies against decisions of The QFC Authority, The Regulatory Authority, and other QFC institutions.

Court FAQs

No. If your appeal is refused, you cannot appeal again.

Yes, but only with permission of the Court.

In the first instance, the parties will usually be responsible for the cost of their own lawyers. However, the Court may make any order as it thinks fit in relation to the legal costs incurred by the parties. Usually, the unsuccessful party will be ordered to pay the costs of the successful party.

If the judges can’t reach a unanimous decision on your case, then the judgment of the Court will be that of the majority of the judges.

After the Court has heard all of the evidence and any submissions made by the lawyers, it will issue its judgment. Sometimes, the Court may issue its judgment on the same day it hears your case but, usually, the judges will need further time to consider the case and will deliver their judgment at a later date.

The Court may make a costs award against you and may even dismiss your Claim or strike out your Defence.

That depends on how complex the case is and how much evidence there is to be considered. Court hearings usually take place between 10am and 4pm, although how many days a hearing will last varies considerably.

You will be required to take an Oath (on a holy book) or Affirmation (a promise to tell the truth) before giving evidence in Court.

If you plan to give evidence in Court, then it is highly likely that you will be asked questions by your own lawyer (if you have one), your opponent’s lawyer (if they have one) and sometimes the judges.

Yes. Court hearings will be in public unless the Court orders otherwise.

The Court will sometimes permit those people who are unable to attend the Court in person, to provide their evidence via audio or video link.

The Court hearings take place in a specialist courtroom located on the 12th floor of Qatar Financial Centre Tower 2. A location map can be found on this website.

Yes. Witnesses who give relevant and admissible evidence in support of your case may be called to give evidence. The Registrar or the Court will usually give directions in relation to witness evidence.

Yes. The Court has the power to order disclosure as it considers necessary.

Yes. If you bring a case against a party who then files a Defence, you will be given an opportunity to file a Reply.

If you are served with a Claim Form, you may wish to consider consulting a lawyer. You must respond to the Claim Form by either admitting the claim against you or by providing a Defence.

Proceedings are commenced by the issue of a Claim Form. Once completed, the Registry will issue the Claim Form on behalf of the Court.

Yes. Court forms are available on this website along with accompanying Notes for Guidance.

Yes. They are available on this website and should be read before commencing a case in Court.

Yes. Although most parties to legal proceedings will decide to instruct a lawyer to represent them, you may  represent yourself in Court should you wish.

Yes. Ordinarily, the Court will allow any qualified lawyer, who is entitled to appear before the superior courts of his or her jurisdiction, to appear before the Court.

If any party to Court proceedings requires an interpreter when giving evidence in Court, the Registrar will arrange for one to be made available.

Proceedings before the Court will usually be in English, although can be conducted in Arabic should the parties so wish.

There are no fees associated with bringing a case to Court. However, if you instruct lawyers you will usually be liable for their fees, unless the Court orders otherwise. You may also be liable for your opponent’s legal fees should you lose your case or should the Court order.

The Registrar is Head of the Court’s Registry and is responsible for the management of the cases before the Court. The Registrar’s biography can be found on this website.

The Registrar, in consultation with the President of the Court, will determine which judges hear which cases.

Judges of the Court sit in panels of three, both at first instance and on appeal.

The judges of the Court are some of the most well-known legal and judicial figures from around the world. Biographies of all the judges of the Court can be found on this website.

No. Although the Court is international in nature, it is a court of the State of Qatar.

The Court has the jurisdiction (the legal authority) to hear civil and commercial disputes where there is connection, pursuant to Article 8(3)(c) of QFC Law No 7 of 2005 (as amended), with the Qatar Financial Centre.

Facilities FAQs

The QICDRC is located in West Bay, Doha city centre and is accessible by numerous means of transport; we recommend airport taxi but for other transportation options visit the contact us section of the website.

The QICDRC admin office is open from 0800 to 1700 Sunday to Thursday. The QICDRC is closed on weekends and official public holidays.

Yes, please visit the contact us section of the website to sign up.

Please complete our online booking enquiry form and a member of the client services team will come back to you within 24 hours. Alternatively please email info@qicdrc.com.qa or call +974 4496 8225.

We can make arrangements to enable wheelchair access. Please email info@qicdrc.com.qa with your requirements in advance of your visit.

Yes, visitors may take photographs in public spaces for personal use. However, no photography is allowed inside the courtroom at any time.

Future hearings with dates and times are posted on the home page of our website.

Yes, Court proceedings are generally held in public and public seating is provided for those who wish to observe cases.

Complimentary refreshments are available in the reception area outside the courtroom. In addition, Costa Coffee is located on the first floor of the building. Our Reception can provide you with further refreshment and catering options.

Most rooms are available to hire with the exception of the court room.

Yes, we are more than happy to accommodate bespoke room layouts. You can take a virtual look around our premises to view rooms and spaces.

QICDRC can provide IP based Video conferencing solution.

All court proceedings are audio recorded and the digital files of these recordings can be provided to parties with the permission of the Registrar or judges. Video recording can be made available if required and if deemed appropriate by the Registrar or judges

Yes, QICDRC have multifunctional printers, scanners, shredders, and many more equipment’s’ available for use by Court users on a chargeable basis. Click here to enquire further.

The QICDRC uses Polycom conferencing system so that parties to court proceedings can use the plug and play user-based software in order to enable secure access. If, for some reason, parties to court proceedings wished to use a Skype-based connection, this could be discussed with the Registrar.